mpdrolet:

Group photo of Hells Angels, Germany, 1976
Christian von Alvensleben

mpdrolet:

Group photo of Hells Angels, Germany, 1976

Christian von Alvensleben

mobylosangelesarchitecture:

ok, some apologies:

  1. today’s architecture update is flawed.  due to me. and my not having my good camera.  i know, a poor workman blames his tools.  to that end: i’m blaming my tools.
  2. i don’t know, i’m sure there’s something else i can apologize for.
  3. oh, that’s right, this palace (for it’s a palace) deserves to be documented and shot over days, with amazing cameras.  instead i had 5 minutes and a point and shoot.

nonetheless, here are pictures of a palace in los feliz.  which is, for those who don’t live in l.a, a part of los angeles.  technically it’s where i live.  i think.  i live in about 10 different neighborhoods:

  • los feliz
  • east hollywood
  • hollywood hills
  • franklin village
  • hollywood
  • beachwood canyon, etc…

but los feliz is one of the neighborhoods i live in.  sort of.  and here’s the palace.  apparently it’s famous for having been the seat of a huge estate at one point.  and over time the estate has been chopped up and sold off.  so now it’s a palace without an estate.  but it’s still amazing.  and apparently jimi hendrix wrote ‘purple haze’ here.  and apparently jimmy page met the devil here.  or something.  i guess it depends upon how you define ‘devil’.  and possibly how you define ‘jimmy page’.

in any case, as i might have mentioned, it’s one of the most amazing houses in l.a.

thanks,

moby

p.s - my friend marya was standing by the pool so i’m including a picture of her in amongst the architecture.

life1nmotion:

Casa JLM by Enrique Cabrera Arquitecto / Chicxulub, Mexico

life1nmotion:

Casa JLM by Enrique Cabrera Arquitecto / Chicxulub, Mexico

(via eclecticdaze)

nevver:

Surf’s up, LeRoy Grannis

ex-qui-sitae:

Chenchow Little Architectes Ang House, Australia

(via simonesepetro)

likeafieldmouse:

James Mollison - Where Children Sleep

Artist’s statement:

"Stories of diverse children around the world, told through portraits and pictures of their bedrooms. When Fabrica asked me to come up with an idea for engaging with children’s rights, I found myself thinking about my bedroom: how significant it was during my childhood, and how it reflected what I had and who I was. It occurred to me that a way to address some of the complex situations and social issues affecting children would be to look at the bedrooms of children in all kinds of different circumstances. From the start, I didn’t want it just to be about ‘needy children’ in the developing world, but rather something more inclusive, about children from all types of situations. This is a selection from the 56 diptychs in the book."

(via chocolateoatmilk)